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Help To Stop Foreclosure

Steps may be taken to delay or stop foreclosure. Homeowners may liquidate assets or insurance to generate cash to make payments. A next step involves contacting the lender in order to attempt a loan modification or repayment plan. If these attempts are unsuccessful, a deed in lieu of foreclosure may be considered. A deed in lieu of foreclosure allows homeowners to relinquish legal rights to their home. The process requires the homeowner to legally transfer ownership to the lender, who will then take back the home without having to foreclose. Both parties must enter the exchange voluntarily and in good faith. If a homeowner cannot manage a loan modification or deed in lieu, bankruptcy may be considered as a means of halting foreclosure. Filing Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy prompts the court to issue an “order for relief” that calls for “automatic stay,” a stipulation that orders creditors to immediately cease collection, including foreclosure. The automatic stay period provides the homeowner with time (sometimes several months) to pause the foreclosure process and catch up on missed payments through a repayment plan, if filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Chapter 13 repayment plans may last up to five years, giving the homeowner ample time to provide missed payments and avoid foreclosure.